Media Influence Matrix

Media Influence Matrix Project

Central European University’s Centre for Media, Data and Society (CEU-CMDS) 

About

Launched in 2017, the CMDS project maps and assesses “the state of journalism on a country-by-country basis”. Country reports include articles, analytical papers and data sets that aim to answer questions on regulation, funding and technology.

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House of lords report

Public service broadcasting: as vital as ever

Public service broadcasting: as vital as ever

By The UK House of Lords Select Committee on Communications

House of lords report
Credit: House of Lords
The House of Lords report on public service broadcasting in the age of video on demand concludes that PSBs are vital and in need of better support to produce high quality content and programming. But they also need to adapt to the changing media landscape in order to better serve audiences.

The report also reveals that public service broadcasting remains prominent within the UK and is a driver of the creative economy. Recommendations include the establishment of a new body called the BBC Funding Commission and to ensure that deals and plans are conducted with more transparency.

Read the PMA response to this report here.


PSB report

Rethinking Public Service Broadcasting’s Place in International Media Development

PSB report
Credit: CIMA

Rethinking Public Service Broadcasting’s Place in International Media Development

By Susan Abbott

This report re-evaluates the role of public service broadcasting (PSB) in the current, international media climate and what its future may hold. 

In her report, Abbott raises critical questions for the media development community regarding what PSB can bring to a crowded digital media environment to ensure media diversity and plurality, the role of donors, what the successes of PSB have been and what its future may entail. In clear and concise language, she also successfully manages to define core terms including what is PSB and how it sets itself apart from state-run broadcasting.


About the author:

Susan Abbott is an independent consultant who specializes in working with non-profit organizations, universities, and donors in the areas of media development, civil society assistance, and digital rights. Abbott provides consulting services for facilitating workshops and training programs, grant writing, monitoring and evaluation, and organizational capacity building.

[Text above sourced from CIMA]


Getting the Message Across

Getting the Message Across

Front cover. Credit: UNESCO
Reporting on Climate Change and Sustainable Development in Asia and the Pacific: A Handbook for Journalists

This book is a vital resource for journalists covering climate change. Through an exploration of the essential aspects of climate change, including its injustices to vulnerable communities and examples of best practice, UNESCO has published a book that effectively contextualises the severity of the issue to help journalists improve the way they report its environmental, social, economic ̧ political and technological implications.

“This Handbook is part UNESCO’s International Programme for the Development of Communication’s Series on Journalism Education. The series aims to reinforce the capacities of journalists, journalism educators and their institutions to promote sustainable development, by enhancing the abilities of journalists to report on science, development and democratic governance.”


Journalism, 'Fake News' and Disinformation: A Handbook for Journalism Education and Training

Journalism, ‘Fake News’ and Disinformation: A Handbook for Journalism Education and Training (UNESCO)

This recent publication explores the key feature of journalism and seeks to guide readers on how to best navigate the news environment and fight against misinformation.

As journalism is constantly transformed and challenged by a wide range of factors, such as technology, politics and users interaction with the media, understanding how journalism works it’s becoming essential.

Written by experts from all around the world and published by UNESCO, this handbook includes modules on trust, critical thinking and social platforms, media literacy, fact checking and combating online abuse.

Given its structure, this handbook is particularly useful for journalism educators as well as media professionals and editors and all those interested in how information is shared and used.


RISJ 2018

RISJ DIgital News Report 2018

RISJ DIgital News Report 2018

This year’s edition of the ever comprehensive Reuters Institute Digital News Report highlights a fall in the use of social media for news in a number of key markets
RISJ 2018
Click image for full report

The extensive report is based on an online survey of 74,000 people from 37 countries, across five continents, and explores issues such as trust in the media, disinformation, viewing trends, podcasting and ad-blockers to name but a few. It also includes new literacy and brand trust for the first time.

A major finding in this year’s report is that the use of social media for news has significantly declined in France, the UK and the USA – the latter being down six percent. According to a summary by report author Nic Newman, the decline is due to a decrease in the discovery, posting, and sharing of news in Facebook. However, there has been a significant rise in the use of private messaging apps as a means to communicate, share and discuss news stories.

Other findings include a relatively stable average level of trust in news, with 44% of respondents claiming they trust it overall. This declines to 34% if referring specifically to news found via a search engine and 23% if found via social media.

With regards to fake news, the survey found that just over half of respondents are concerned about fake news, with the highest percentages found in countries with the “most polarised political situations”. 75% of respondents also believe that responsibility to fix unreliable news lies with publishers, while 71% believe the same for platforms, with some appetite for government intervention.

Find out more about this in-depth report by following the link below.


Old, Educated, and Politically Diverse

Old, Educated, and Politically Diverse

The Audience of Public Service News

Anne Schulz, David A. L. Levy, and Rasmus Kleis Nielsen – Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

Abstract

Public service media are often widely used, highly trusted, and do not face the business pressures with which their private peers have to contend. But a closer look suggests that the challenges that face public service media news provision are bigger – much bigger – than is commonly acknowledged, even in countries with a long history of strong public service media. This report analyses survey data from a sample of eight countries to assess the reach of public service news. It finds that the audience for public service news is old, educated, and politically diverse, and that public service media in many countries fall far short of the ambition to provide a near-universal news service, especially online. While they are among the most widely trusted news sources, they are often less trusted by people on the political right and people with populist attitudes.

Full report

PSM & Democracy

PSM & Democracy

EBU

Abstract

A healthy democracy is strongly linked to a healthy public service media.

‘Democracy & PSM’ demonstrates how countries with robust public service broadcasting systematically rank higher in core democratic indicators. Our correlations show the benefits associated with a strong and well-funded public broadcaster.

The research shows that in countries where PSM is well-funded and enjoys a high market share:

  • People are more active in politics
  • There is more political stability and an absence of violence
  • Corruption is under control

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Full report

First Draft’s Essential Guide to Responsible Reporting in an Age of Information Disorder

First Draft’s Essential Guide to

Responsible Reporting in an Age of Information Disorder (PDF)

First Draft

Abstract

This guide helps to spark discussions on best editorial practice in approaching and covering issues such as terrorism, conspiracy theories, manipulated content in an age of technological innovations and information disorder. 

Full report

Future and Emerging Technologies for the Media Sector

Future and Emerging Technologies for the Media Sector

MediaRoad

Abstract

The second Vision Paper by MediaRoad’s Policy Hub analyses the potential impact of six technological trends (Artificial Intelligence (AI), Immersive technologies, Blockchain, 5G, Internet of Things (IoT) and Convergence) on the media sector together with their political, social and economic consequences.

Based on the analysis, the paper puts forward policy recommendations with the aim of supporting a positive impact of these technologies on European society. The technological trends considered are at different stages of development and, as a consequence, some of them have already consistent European policy and legal frameworks established and running; others are at a less mature stage of development and societal appropriation.

Full report